Category Archives: Caribbean Islands

Samana Humpback Whale Watching

Samana Whale Watching-1

Surprising Fact: Dominican Whale Watching Easier and Better Than Alaska.

Riding the top deck of a 45-foot whale watching boat hunting for humpback whales in the Bay of Samana, I keep comparing the Dominican Republic landscape with that of another famous whaling ground: Alaska. From a considerable distance, the Samana coastline appears heavily forested with row after row of terraced trees rising above the shoreline. To me, this unbroken canopy mimics the uninhabited, isolated regions of the far north.

Making comparisons to Alaska is inevitable since whale watching is one of the state’s best-known attractions. Yet the odds of seeing humpbacks are actually better here in the Dominican Republic. The Bay of Samana is one of the whale’s most important breeding and calving grounds, with between 2,000 and 3,000 of the giant mammals migrating here each January.

A naturalist explains over the boat’s crackling loudspeaker that the whales move south for calving season because a newborn humpback—even though it weighs close to a ton–lacks enough fat to survive in the cold waters of the North Atlantic.

The adults stay in the DR’s warm waters until the calves are fit to travel, which begins around the middle to the end of March. From Samana, the humpbacks return to their summer feeding grounds located between North America, Greenland and Iceland.
Samana is central to the whales’ reproductive cycle. Since humpbacks have a gestation period of about a year, the calves now being born in the Bay of Samana are probably the result of the previous season’s mating.

Humpback whale Samana Peninsula Dominican Republic                   Atlantic humpback whales are dark on the top, white underneath.

As the boat narrator points out, the Bay of Samana is only one area of the Dominican Republic where the humpbacks winter but it is the most accessible place for whale watching. He claims that at the moment virtually every humpback whale from the western North Atlantic—whose home waters are from 2,000 to 4,000 distant from Samana–is now lounging somewhere around the Dominican Republic.

This information deeply impresses Nina, a 10-year old Dominican girl seated next to me. Tightly hugging her most important possession, a bright pink knapsack featuring the famous blonde-haired Barbie, Nina is amazed to hear that humpbacks have traveled thousands of miles to have their babies in her homeland.

“Are the baby whales born here Dominicans, too, just like me?” she asks the boat’s narrator.

He has to think about that. “Yes, I guess you could say that,” he answers. “And that means all the humpback whales in our part of the world are Dominicans, too, since they were all born somewhere near the Dominican Republic.”

Nina smiles and hugs her Barbie knapsack tighter. For the moment, she doesn’t seem to care if she even sees a whale today.

The other 60 passengers with her do. We’re all becoming antsy. Normally, whales would be sighted by now, but we have high rolling seas, which makes spotting more difficult. More and more of us are imagining tail flukes and waterspouts in the tossing white froth.

When the first genuine whale spout finally is sighted, there’s no dramatic “Thar she blows,” just a huge collective sigh of relief.

Humpback whale pod exhale spray Samana Peninsula Dominican Republic                               Two humpback whales surface near our boat.

Humpbacks are known as the most playful of all whales, which has me hoping that at least one of the animals will breach, or jump skyward. Although it doesn’t happen this day, a succession of whales entertains us thoroughly as they roll on their sides, wave their flukes, or flip their massive tails skyward when they sound.

Several times we are almost eye to eye with a humpback whale, which is classified only as a medium-sized whale. They grow from 30 to 50 feet in length with the largest weighing as much as 29 tons, or 58,000 pounds. They are almost tiny compared to the blue whale, the largest creature on earth. The largest known blue whale was 110 feet long and weighed 209 tons, or a whopping 418,000 pounds.

But on our 45-foot boat, the humpbacks are goliath enough. As we drift within 20 to 30 yards of a large adult, I’m close enough to start counting the fleshy knobs (called tubercles) on the whale’s massive head, so big it takes up more than a third of a humpback’s body. In the clear water, I can easily distinguish the body color; black on top and white on the bottom.

We end up spending less than an hour of our three-hour trip with the whales but I am well satisfied. I’ve seen more humpbacks in Samana and gotten closer to them than I ever have on several Alaskan trips. And in Samana I do it on a bright sunny day where the wintertime temperature always hovers somewhere in the 80s. I can’t ask for more.

Well, maybe a breach or two. But I’m told later, that almost never happens with humpbacks in Samana. Perhaps because all their energy is concentrated on mating.

 Humpback whale watching boats tourists Samana Peninsula Dominican Republic                     You can choose between large and small whale watching boats.

If you go: Victoria Marine is considered one of Samana’s most reputable whale watching operators. In fact, owner Kim Beddall pioneered whale watching here in 1990. And if you don’t see whales, your next trip is free.

Victoria Marine uses the 55-foot custom whale watching vessel Pura Mia, which carries up to 65 passengers.  A marine mammal specialist narrates and answers questions on every trip.  Narration is done in English and Spanish with interpreters available on board. Dramamine tablets supplied on request. (Yes, the Bay of Samana does get rough sometimes).  Price is US$50 for an adult plus USD$3 Samana sanctuary fee; under 10 US$25.

Their trip schedule makes it obvious the best whale watching is the end of February. From January 15-February 15, tours depart once a day at 10 a.m. From February 16-March 9, the boat leaves at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.  Tours continue to run daily until March 25. The Pura Mia  leaves from the Samana town dock, with pickup for those staying at Cayo Levantado scheduled 30 minutes after the boat departs Samana city, officially known as Santa Barbara de Samana.

Virtually all the large whale watching boats depart the Samana town dock, while smaller and faster craft leave either from there or locations outside the city. A small boat may not be what you want for high seas but on calm days they could be perfect.

Samana has established strict whale watching regulations to prevent boats from crowding the animals. Like all celebrities, humpbacks prefer to be left alone.

Horseback Ride To Samana’s El Limon Waterfall

     El Limon-26-2
Riders on the El Limon waterfall trail in the Sierra Samana mountain range.

Dominican Republic Arrival Has Memorable Start

When a plane lands at an airport and fire trucks quickly begin spraying water over the fuselage, that’s normally a sign of big, big trouble. But that isn’t the case when my JetBlue flight touches down at El Catey International Airport at Samana, in the Dominican Republic.

Instead, as we were advised before landing, streams of water are a traditional way to welcome an airline’s inaugural flight.  I notice they also have a practical purpose: washing off the plane’s windows for its return flight.

This arrival celebration marked the beginning of JetBlue’s direct New York-JFK service to Samana, placing this remote section of the Dominican Republic in much easier reach for visitors from the U.S Northeast and Canada. Our arrival  also made  JetBlue the leading U.S. carrier to the Dominican Republic, with regularly scheduled JetBlue flights arriving at every major destination including  Santo Domingo, Punta Cana, Puerto Plata and La Romana in addition to Samana.

   El Limon-35   El Limon-36
Our inaugural flight had a special greeting.      El Catey International Airport, Samana

The inaugural shower at the Samana airport is a fitting start to a trip that will include visits to some of Samana’s most popular attractions, including the 130-foot high Falls of El Limon (also known as Salto El Limón and Cascada el Limon).

While it’s possible to reach the falls on foot, it probably would be a lonely, rough and likely a muddy trek. Most people prefer to go by horse, which is an unexpected adventure in itself. In the Samana countryside near the falls are various paradas (literally means “stops”) where small ranchers organize excursions to the falls.

Our chosen ranch is Parada Basilio & Ramona’s,  located in the tiny community of Sendero el Café. We gather in their open air dining room and learn we must pick through an assortment of bike helmets and knee-high rubber boots, considered essential equipment for our ride. The bike helmets are to protect us in case we fall off a horse, an understandable precaution, especially considering the steep inclines and descents we expect to encounter.

                     El Limon-33                      El Limon-29
              Ranchers advertise with small signs.             Guide protects saddle from rain.

The boots are a surprise. Turns out our horses will be crossing several swift streams where the water could indeed come close to our knees. It’s been raining on and off so the rivers are swollen.  Good news in one sense since it ensures El Limon waterfall will be at full flow. We’re also given an option of taking a raincoat; I stuff one in my backpack for just is case.

A line of horses waits for us, each one held by a villager who not only will serve as our guide but accompany us for the entire trip. As each of us mounts up, a guide is ready to jog beside the horse and stay glued to his rider for the rest of the trip. This helps ensure there will be no horseplay here with people competing to the top. A good approach considering many of the winding trails are narrow and tight without space for two horses to pass.

And river crossings? There are two in each direction.  Considering that since the age of 12 every horse I ever have ridden wanted to take a roll in the water when I am in the saddle.
But not on this extensive river crossing trip. Having a guide leading with the reins makes these a tranquil crossing.  My horse also seems to understand the occasional urgings and encouragement.  I’m also encouraged enough to risk a camera to record the crossings.   

    El Limon-31-2             El Limon-28  
    My view of my horse’s crossings.                   Guides make sure it’s a safe crossing.

The bumpy ride to the falls takes about 45 minutes. At trail’s end, we reach a large open-air bar and restaurant with almost a dozen picnic tables. The shelter is crowded with riders from other paradas, some like us ready to make the descent to the pool beneath the falls, others preparing to depart.

With new people constantly coming and going, there is no secure place to leave anything and since your guide will be at your side, don’t expect to find anyone to guard whatever you want to leave behind for your trek to the base of the falls. What you ride off with stays with you for the entire time. Travel light.

Salto El Limón are located at the top of the Sierra Samana mountain range, about a thousand feet above sea level. The waterfalls are opposite us, on the other side of the Limon River. Unfortunately, this day is overcast and a light mist (clouds?) blur their impressive display. On a clear day, just the front yard of the bar would be a great view.

            El Limon-23
         View of El  Limon waterfall in front of the bar/restaurant where rides end.

It’s a walk of several hundred feet down to the pool at the base of the falls. The way down is on a long series of slippery wooden steps with a guard rail for support.  Considering the width at the top, the base of the waterfall is surprisingly narrow so thick plumes of water plunge down into the Limon River from the channel called Arroyo Chico. The rain has turned the river into an uninviting muddy brown, not at all appealing for swimming.

Most of our group continues on, wading the swift waters with a guide at their elbow to reach the opposite bank and make the climb to a second pool better for swimming. Others stay behind to watch two guys dancing atop big rocks being pummeled with water at the base of Arroyo Chico.

When it’s time to make the return climb from the falls, the thousand-foot altitude seems to work against flatlanders who live in low country. There’s a surprising amount of huffing and puffing, especially my own, with occasional rest stops to suck in air. Maybe it’s the steep incline but it feels like we’re higher than a mere 1,000 feet.

Back at the top we meet a large group of Europeans from the Norwegian cruise line Hurtigruten. Their ship is docked in Samana Bay near the provincial capital of Santa Barbara de Samana, the Caribbean’s prime place for viewing humpback whales from mid-January to the end of March.

I finally got to know my guide a little while at the falls. He’s a 14-year old student who is out of school today thanks to a holiday. Instead of taking the day off, he’s here hoping to earn a tip, the only pay he’ll receive for his work. It’s the same situation for all the guides, though none of us knew this in advance. If we had, some of us would be better prepared because these people have worked hard. There will be a lot of furtive borrowing and lending at the end as soon as we dismount.

El Limon-30     El Limon-31
Steep stairway to the falls.                        Base of El  Limon waterfall.

Fortunately, the rains hold off until we make the shelter of the bar. Then we experience an intense but short-lived frog strangler in which the distant falls are almost blotted out. Soon it’s time to mount up and head back. The horses are motivated to return to their pasture; the trip down is 15 minutes shorter than our ascent. And the sun actually comes out briefly to show what a beautiful countryside we are riding through.

Some paradas, unlike Basilio & Ramona’s, use mules instead of horses. Considering the frequent web complaints about mules repeatedly trying to leave the trail and how much harder mules are to handle than a horse, a parada with horses seems definitely preferable.

So is one that serves food. After completing our trip of about 2.5 hours, we’re treated to a truly varied lunch: grilled chicken, spaghetti and tomato sauce, refried beans, rice and a mixed salad of lettuce, tomatoes, onions and fruit. Especially appreciated is that king of beers, Dominican-brewed Presidente.

This has been fun. Now, if that stream of water that started at the airport will just disappear for the rest of my time on the Samana Peninsula.  (It does, as the my next three Samana posts show.)

For more information about things to do in Samana, click here. For Samana cruise port information, click here.
l

If You Go To El Limon
Many tourists tend to wait until the afternoon, so mornings are less crowded and avoid the hottest part of the day. Wait too late and you could be riding back in the dark, not a happy prospect.

Bring a backpack with water, a snack and sunscreen. If you plan to swim, wear your suit. For the ride, wear jeans, not shorts. Bring an extra pair of socks because the ones you wear while riding could get wet. A wide brimmed hat works well against the hot sun—and also rain.

Universal Orlando & Royal Caribbean Vacation Connection

Freedom of Seas logo-1

Tim and I are not fans of roller coasters. But after 3 days at Universal Orlando Resort, we’ve considered retesting our old fear factors. And thought about combining a stay at Universal with a Bahamas or Eastern Caribbean cruise from nearby Port Canaveral the next time the grandkids are in town.

Universal Orlando Resort and Royal Caribbean Cruise Line have a partnership that brings together two of the world’s most popular vacation providers with a variety of getaway packages. And with the world’s only Wizarding World of Harry Potter theme park located at Universal’s Islands of Adventure, the theme park/cruise combo is more enticing than ever.

Freedom of Seas-1  Freedom of Seas-5  Freedom of Seas-11

For the cruise portion, the choices are a 3- or 4-nights aboard Monarch of the Seas or Jewel of the Seas and a longer voyage on their much larger sister ship, Freedom of the Seas. All ships offer the complimentary Adventure Ocean  youth program for ages 3-17 with separate activities for designated age groups and their own dedicated spaces. The daily programs start at 9am for younger children, while for those 15-17 their true party time begins in their own night club at 10pm and ends well after midnight. With all of the Adventure Ocean activities supervised by the ship’s trained personnel, parents actually do have the opportunity to relax and enjoy some adult time without worrying whether their kids are bored or getting in trouble.

The Monarch and Jewel calls in Nassau, Bahamas, and at CocoCay, Royal Caribbean’s private island in the Bahamas. CocoCay offers the usual water sports options as well as an Aqua-Park for children, beautiful beaches, shaded hammocks, a beachfront barbeque, and a straw market.

Shipboard life on the Monarch and Jewel include Broadway-style musical revues; Vegas-style gaming in Casino Royale; a rock climbing wall and the opportunity to just plain relax in the Day Spa. Don’t worry whether your kids will miss you. They have more varied on-board fun opportunities than adults.

Freedom of Seas-2   Freedom of Seas-4  Freedom of Seas-9  Freedom of Seas-24

For a longer cruise, Freedom of the Seas has alternating week-long itineraries  in the Eastern and Western Caribbean. The Eastern Caribbean option includes 3 days at sea with stops at St. Thomas, St. Maarten, and CocoCay, RCCL’s private island. On Freedom’s Western Caribbean sojourn, passengers spend only 2 days at sea and stop at Ocho Rios, Jamaica; George Town, Grand Cayman; Cozumel, Mexico; and Labadee, a private resort on the north coast of Haiti. Since 1986, RCCL’s Labadee stops have provided largest proportion of tourist revenue to the impoverished island’s economy. Although often described as an island, Labadee  is not an island but a peninsula adjoining Haiti.

Because of its large size, Freedom of the Seas can offer many activities not available on Monarch of the Seas. Facilities like the FlowRider surf simulator; the H20 Zone water park; Studio B ice-skating rink; a full-size boxing ring; cantilevered whirlpools suspended 112 ft. above the ocean; Chefmakers Cooking Academy; Karaoke Superstar and more. The recently added Dreamworks Experience allows youngsters to interact with popular Dreamworks characters such as Shrek and the Penguins of Madagascar. For dining, there’s a choice of eight onboard restaurants, including Royal Caribbean’s signature specialty Chops Grille steakhouse, Portofino Italian restaurant and a Johnny Rockets 50’s-style eatery; you can be sure no one will go hungry.

Freedom of Seas-7  Freedom of Seas-10  Freedom of Seas-19

These cruises (see sample of all itineraries) are exciting by themselves but coupled with the fun of Universal Studios and Universal’s Islands of Adventure plus the entertainment/dining at CityWalk , your trip really could fall into a one-of-kind vacationalooza.

In Part 2, we’ll talk about the experience with our grandkids at Universal Orlando and why Florida residents (like us) with visiting guests may be foolishly throwing money away by staying at home and not moving everyone into one of Universal’s hotels. The theme park extras you receive for staying on-property are likely to dwarf the hotel room costs.

Freedom of Seas DR-1

All photos taken aboard Freedom of the Seas.

By Linda & Tim O’Keefe

Cruise Insurance—Yes or No?



No Bahamas cruises this weekend!

THIS WEEKEND will be an unhappy one for many cruisers. They will be traveling to destinations they didn’t intend—or want—to visit, thanks to Hurricane Irene. Some cruisers will be able to cancel with no penalties, while perhaps the majority will have to put up with a cruise to not-where-they-wanted.

Now is a good time for anyone planning a cruise to consider the need for cruise insurance. Because of more than just Hurricane Irene.

This week has been a bizarre series of natural events no one could forecast. Just as last summer–who could have predicted that the eruption of an Icelandic volcano would make air travel to Northern Europe impossible for lengthy periods. (Which also made it impossible for countless cruise passengers to leave port on time.)

The 5.8 earthquake that originated in Virginia was felt from Atlanta to Maine. And it closed JFK airport for a short period of time. (As one who is in Virginia in an old river cottage 8 feet above the ground, the cautious JFK delay is understandable. Our cottage swayed right and left and the chair I was sitting in started tap dancing. It was like a simulator ride at one of the theme parks, only it was real.)

Now, Hurricane Irene is in the process of plowing through the Bahamas after visiting its destruction on the Turks & Caicos as well as parts of the Dominican Republic. Based on the latest forecast, Irene will spend its next few days bordering the U.S. Atlantic coast with its final destination near Boston. Irene will close many of these airports, making it impossible to fly out.

Airlines are waiving rebooking fees for travelers where Irene caused havoc and made a decent vacation impossible.

Cruise ships, on the other hand, normally depart come hell or high water because of their high overhead. For one, they can’t be as tolerant because each vessel has hundreds, if not thousands, of waiters, stateroom staff, cooks and other crew most other cruisers never know about who receive their main income—not from the cruise line—but from the tips they receive from passengers. And, there are other factors.

Back to cruise insurance: Anyone booking a Bermuda, Bahamas or Caribbean cruise between Aug. 15-Oct. 15 is gambling they won’t have to worry about a tropical storm or hurricane. Cruises normally offer discounts during this time for a good reason.

Beyond seasonal weather problems, there always is the chance of accidents while on a cruise. In Greece, I once watched a family left behind at the cruise dock (they had been waiting for their luggage to be unloaded) because the father had decided to rent a scooter. He was an M.D., who probably thought he could handle any of the family’s medical problems. Normally, he would have been correct. Only, this time he was the problem.

All cruise lines offer their own insurance. Travel agents do, too. And there are other independent insurance companies, too. Many exclude “acts of god” which would include storms, volcanoes and earthquakes. None that I know of state you can cancel because your cruise ship changed its itinerary due to a storm.

Fortunately, more companies are offering the option of Cancel for Any Reason, and that would include your cruise ship deviating from its scheduled itinerary—but only if you know this in advance. Here are the normal requirements for Cancel for Any Reason.

To qualify for this coverage, typically you must buy the of insurance within two weeks after your booking or your first trip payment. This type of policy allows you to cancel your trip for any reason not on the list of “named perils or otherwise covered.”

To insure your trip, you must buy coverage for the cruise’s full pre-paid price. Also, to cancel a trip for a reason that is “not otherwise covered” or in the list of “named perils” you must cancel at least 2 or 3 days prior to departure. 

Cancel for any Reason could require a “co-payment” on your part covering between 10 to 50 per cent of your trip cost, depending on the plan. Or the policy could require none. That’s why you truly need to read the fine print when considering any policy.

A web site I like is one not sponsored by a travel insurance provider. To rely on one insurance company to compare the policies of its competition for you seems like inviting the fox into the hen house.

With over 50 plans from leading insurers to choose from, QuoteWright was voted “Best of the Web” by The Washington Post for its quality comparisons. In their comparison of  Cancel for Any Reason policies from different companies, the links spell out whether the coverage is 100% or 50%, which helps to cut down the time needed to study coverage and policy prices.

In addition, don’t overlook the coverage that you may already have through the credit card you used to book and pay for your cruise.  You did use a credit card and not a debit card or a check, right?


The end of September in 2009.

Port of Samana, Dominican Republic

Overview Map

Samana is one of the least visited areas on the Caribbean’s most visited island.
This port deserves a lot more traffic.

An Overlooked Port of Call

Although the Dominican Republic is the most visited island in the Caribbean,  cruise ships from U.S. ports are amazingly sparse.  From what I’ve been able to determine online, only 3 cruise lines are scheduling stops at the Port of Samana in the coming year: Royal Caribbean, Holland America and Norwegian Caribbean (NCL).

Strange, considering the Port of Samana is the entryway to one of the Eastern Caribbean’s few remaining unspoiled regions. Furthermore, each winter thousands of humpback whales migrate to the Bay of Samana and provide the unusual opportunity to view these titans at unusually close distance. That’s a shore excursion not possible anywhere else in the Caribbean.  Also available here are waterfall treks, zip lining and (according to Conde Nast Traveler) one of  the world’s 10 best beaches.

The Samana Peninsula, among the few Caribbean areas offering an authentic island experience, remains largely undeveloped,  without the same-same of most other island ports. But why are there so few cruise passengers to enjoy all this?

Port Location
The Port of Samana is located on the Samana Peninsula, on the northeast coast of the Dominican Republic. In terms of size, the Samana Peninsula is larger than many other Caribbean islands. From the town of Sanchez near the start of the peninsula to the road’s end at Las Galeras is about 40 miles in length. The spit of land is about 10 miles wide at its widest point.

The Atlantic Ocean borders the peninsula’s north coast; the Bay of Samana flanks its south shore. The Port of Samana is located at the capital of Samana Province and its largest city, Santa Bárbara de Samana, often called Samana or Samana City.

Some cruise lines prefer to call this stop Cayo Levantado Port after the small island in Samana Bay (a popular day excursion) over Port of Samana. Regardless, your ship ends up at the same anchorage in the Bay of Samana.

Main Area Attractions
The Samana Peninsula is one of the least developed parts of the Dominican Republic and has terrific eco travel opportunities. Some of the beaches here are superb. Playa Rincon, for instance, was rated one of the world’s 10 best by Conde Nast Traveler. Samana City’s main attraction is a unique one: the chance to get up close to humpback whales–better than you ever will in Alaska—but in warm weather during winter months. Horseback riding, ATV rides, offshore fishing and waterfall treks are just a few of the other varied shore excursions.

Docking Facilities
The cruise ship anchors in the Bay of Samana between one and two miles from Samana City. Ship tenders shuttle passengers back and forth to the tender pier, a trip of about 10 minutes. Restroom facilities are available at the tender pier.

Local Transportation
The town of Samana is small and can easily be explored on foot. However, mini-van taxis are available near the tender pier, their rates posted in U. S. dollars. Rates are based on eight passengers and include a 2 hour waiting time at your destination. Additional time is billed at $20 per hour. Taxi drivers sometimes want to fill their cab with eight passengers before departing, which could cause delay. Rental carsalso are available.

Tourism Information
The Ministry of Tourism has representatives in the taxi dispatch and information booth outside the tender pier.

Money Matters
Local currency is the Dominican peso. Its symbol is RD$ to distinguish it from the U.S. dollar. Each peso is divided into 100 centavos (“cents”). Some small stores may provide change in pesos. Credit cards are not widely accepted. ATMs and banks are close to the cruise pier. Banks include such familiar names as Scotia Bank and Banco Popular. (See current exchange rate)

Internet Centers and WIFI
Although Samana is an out-of-the way location, free internet and wifi are available at many restaurants and other establishments all over Samana City.

Samana Cruise Ship Dominican Republic

At the Port of Samana, ships anchor off Samana City and tender
passengers ashore, a journey of about 10 minutes.

Samana City Sights

Cayo Levantado
A small offshore island about 10 minutes from the cruise pier, is a popular day excursion for swimming, snorkeling and beach BBQs. Also called Bacardi Island because of the 1970s rum campaign filmed on its beautiful beaches.

Shipwreck Museum located next to the cruise tender dock features an exhibit of artifacts recovered from shipwrecks by Deep Blue Marine, Inc., the company with the exploration and rescue concession for underwater explorations in the DR. The museum is equipped with a modernized conservation lab with a well-stocked gift shop specifically added for cruise ship passengers. The exhibitions, which do occasionally change, have included objects from Le Scipion, a French warship that fought in the American War of Independence (Revolutionary War), as well as other major historical wrecks. The museum is located next to the  cruise ship tender dock.

Shopping  Whenever a cruise ship visits, an open air market comes alive along the Malecon, the walkway semi-circling the port. Even if you aren’t planning to shop, a stroll along the Malecon has a festive air when the tents are full of jewelry, paintings and various handiworks. When cruise ships are absent, head to the Town Park off the waterfront where vendors sell arts and crafts at a bazaar-type market. Vendors take cash only. They may not have change for US$ dollars, only pesos.

Whale Museum & Nature Center
This small museum, about a mile from the cruise tender pier walking the waterfront on Av. La Marina, explains the migration pattern and life habits of the humpback whales that travel to Samana Bay each winter. A highlight of the museum is a skeleton of a 40-foot humpback. Open daily 9-2 Monday to Saturday. Admission fee about US$2; 809/538-2042

Cayacoa Beach
You have to share Samana City’s main public beach with guests staying at the Hotel Bahia Principe Cayacoa., A 20-30 minute walk from the cruise pier, you reach the hotel and beach by following the waterfront route.

Cayo Vigía
You reach this small island behind the Cayacoa hotel using a long footbridge. Cayo Vigia obviously has experienced better times but the walk is worth the view for photographing Samana City, the port, and the bay. You also can take a swim here.

La Churcha
Located a few blocks off the waterfront on Calle Duarte, this landmark church was brought from England and reassembled piece by piece in the 1820s. Originally a Methodist church, it is now home to the Evangelical Church of Samana. The Sunday services are celebrated with gospels.

Map & photos from Dominican Republic Ministry of Tourism

World’s First All-Inclusive Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in DR

This Punta Cana resort is still establishing its priorities

Hard Rock Hotel, Punta Cana, Dom Rep-5

The Dominican Republic continues its long resort-building spree, giving the island more than 35% of all the hotel rooms in the Caribbean. Most line the beaches in the Punta Cana area where it seems like every hotel chain under the sun has been here for years. Is there anything really new and different?

Yes and no. Hard Rock Hotels–already in Bali, Singapore, Las Vegas and Orlando—was bound to appear somewhere in the Caribbean sooner or later. It has, sort of. Punta Cana’s new Moon Palace Resort, Casino and Spa rebranded itself as the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino last November and turned into the world’s first all-inclusive Hard Rock.  Palace resorts are well-known in Mexico but totally unknown in the DR.  The Hard Rock name seems to have accomplished its goal.

Hard Rock Hotel, Punta Cana, Dom Rep-16  Hard Rock Hotel, Punta Cana, Dom Rep-19
The main entrance could be more impressive       Rooms are spread out in several long wings

How well does American rock n’ roll mix with Dominican sun n’ sand? Surprisingly well based on my 3 day stay. Yet I feel the resort still is in the process of establishing its identity: is it a family- and couples-friendly all-inclusive or (considering its facilities) is it really more of a convention hotel? The meeting facilities here are enormous, able to accommodate almost 7,000 people, enough for a small political convention.

With two such different audiences, is the Hard Rock Punta Cana the right place for you?Will it deliver what you want and expect on an all-inclusive vacation?

I suspect that depends on the time of year. When I was there in mid-April, it seemed there were mostly conventioneers. Yet this summer the Hard Rock offers a Kids Stay Free promotion through August with the added bonus of $1,500 or more in resort credit  through the end of the year (based on length of stay) that can be used for spa treatments, golf, area tours or casino gaming.

Here is what the Hard Rock Resort Punta Cana does offer: all rooms have a private balcony, a double Jacuzzi tub, a dual shower (that could hold as many as 5 people, if not more), robes and slippers, a liquor dispenser and 24-hour room service. A bottle of red wine is available when you check in provided In-room wireless service is free for those with their laptops and—get this—so are unlimited calls to the U.S. and Canada. Personally, I’ve never experienced that before anywhere in the Caribbean and neither had most of my fellow travelers.

Hard Rock Hotel, Punta Cana, Dom Rep-3
All rooms feature a double Jacuzzi tub usually located off the private balcony

The Hard Rock emphasizes variety. The huge 65,000-foot Rock Spa stresses privacy with single and couples spa suites, fitness center, hydrotherapy center and ice pool. An18-hole Jack Nicklaus-designed 7,253-yard, par 72 championship golf course along with the 19th hole Cana Bay Palace’s Casa Club with its snacks and drinks are also included as part of the all-inclusive package. Walk-ins pay $245.

The beach in this area tends to have rough surf but the 8 swimming pools—including one with kid’s slide—more than compensate. Also for youngsters are an impressive games arcade, a climbing wall with instructors and mini-golf course.

When it comes to dining, expect about 10 different dining places (the number of options keeps changing) but not all are true restaurants. The choices are eclectic: a specialty steak house as well as Mexican, Italian, Brazilian, Asian and buffet-style restaurants along with ice cream & pizza stops, delis and poolside eateries. And, yes, you can call for room service 24 hours a day although the menu isn’t extensive. Overall the food was good, the plate presentation outstanding but portions tending to the smaller side in the ala-carte restaurants. You might want pizza afterwards to fill you up.

Hard Rock Hotel, Punta Cana, Dom Rep-12
                The Hard Rock Punta Cana has the Caribbean’s largest casino

The casino (with a deli in one corner) is the Caribbean’s largest gaming room with more than 450 slots, 40 table games, poker room and a Sportsbook boasting 86 screens. In addition, you’ll find plenty of watering holes and definitely want to peruse the impressive display of rock memorabilia scattered around the main hotel building, but what’s really missing here is nightlife.

Surprisingly, you won’t find the live nighttime shows that almost most all-inclusive resorts offer. Hard Rock is promising to offer one concert a month but that leaves 29 or 30 other nights to entertain yourself. If you’ve ever visited the area, you know Punta Cana area is one of those places where the resort needs to provide everything because the options are limited outside the gates.

You may find that crucial, but that aspect didn’t bother me. I’d gladly return to the Punta Cana Hard Rock Hotel & Casino anytime.

For Reservations Call: 1-888-762-5002; front desk: 1-809-731-0000 or its website.

For more pictures of the Punta Cana Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, click here

St. Vincent, In The Rarely Visited Caribbean

Dominica Carib Canoe-1

Looking down on the St. Vincent cruise terminal at Kingstown

THIS is where the notorious Capt. Bligh left his lasting mark

The main reason Linda and I chose this 35-day Maasdam itinerary is because the ship stops at places most cruise lines don’t. The island of St. Vincent in the Grenadines was a major attraction because I hadn’t seen it for far too long. With scuba diving now on my back burner, a cruise is my best way back to St. Vincent.

Based on yesterday’s post about Carib Indian history, what does St. Vincent have to do with the topic? One of its major attractions is the oddity of the cannon placement at Fort Duvernette, located 195 feet and 250 steps above the Caribbean. The unfortunate soldiers involved in its construction in the 1800s had to haul the cannons to the top. Once at the summit, the cannons were not aimed seaward–all the cannons face inland.

The British were terrified of the fierce Carib Indians who waged a bloody 7-year war from their mountain hideouts. The Vincentians proudly claim their country is the only place in the hemisphere where a fort was designed to repel invaders from the land instead of the sea. Some of the local literature, however, doesn’t make it clear that the Caribs were their greatest threat, not other European soldiers.

The Caribs may not have their own Territory here as in Dominica but their heritage survives. They intermarried with the black slaves brought over to work the sugarcane, a mix that accounts for the heritage of most present day Vincentians.

St Vincent Maasdam-1

The Maasdam at dock in St. Vincent

St. Vincent is a late-comer when it comes to Caribbean cruising. Cruise ships didn’t start visiting St. Vincent until 1999 but passengers had such bad experiences with hustling locals (think Jamaica and the panhandlers on the beach) and the poor condition of the capital and cruise port of Kingstown that cruise ships became scarce. Tourism officials learned a lesson and in 2006 St. Vincent received one of “The Most Improved Destination” awards from Dream World Cruise Destinations magazine.

The cruise dock is located at the edge of Kingstown and the small terminal building is among the Caribbean’s most user friendly. It’s an easy walk into town from here but seeing the real St. Vincent and its St. Lucia rain forest-like lushness requires a cab or a tour. One popular stop is Fort Charlotte but of special interest is the village of Barraouallie beyond it, not only a fishing but a whaling community.

That’s right–whaling from nothing more than an unusually long motorized canoe. Whaling in St. Vincent has a long tradition, but in truth the Vincentians do the whale population little damage. The harpoon is thrown by hand, which almost requires the harpoonist to stand over a whale and drive the point in with the force of his own weight. Whales are taken only once in several years, so the whaling industry is hardly a thriving or threatening one.

St Vincent Botanical Garden Sign -1

Entrance sign to New World’s oldest botanic gardens

My own interest is to revisit St. Vincent’s famous Botanical Gardens. Founded in 1765 , by General Robert Melville, Gov. of the Windward Islands. These 20-acres comprise the oldest botanic gardens in the Western Hemisphere. At that time, they were administered by the British War Office and charged to cultivate and improve native plants and to import others from similar climates that would improve the island’s resources. From St. Vincent, some of these plants went out to other islands, which not only dramatically changed the islands’ foliage but added new food sources for both settlers and slaves.

The gardens’ most famous plant is also one of the Caribbean’s most important: a “cutting” from the original breadfruit tree brought from Tahiti by Capt. William Bligh in 1793 from Tahiti, Polynesia. This is the same Capt. Bligh of the famous in 1789 Bounty mutiny. Not only was he a skilled navigator–it’s amazing he and his crew survived the mutiny–but obviously a skilled horticulturist since young plants on a long voyage had to be maintained since the seeds of breadfruit die quickly when stored. From St. Vincent, breadfruit was introduced to the rest of the Caribbean.

St Vincent breadfruit sign-1

Sign marking Capt. Bligh’s famous breadfruit tree

St. Vincent’s breadfruit “cutting” has grown into an enormous tree, probably at least 85 high, the tallest they grown. Many say breadfruit as tasting potato-like or freshly baked bread. Those are polite descriptions of what I consider to be dry and tasteless, perhaps my least favorite of Caribbean “vegetables.” Being Irish, I know a little bit of how potatoes are supposed to taste. To breadfruit, I say “yuck!”

Despite not wanting to eat breadfruit, standing in front of Capt. Bligh’s massive and historic 200-year old tree is a surprisingly humbling feeling. Breadfruit and other plants first planted here truly changed the Caribbean landscape. But St. Vincent can’t be blamed for introducing sugarcane into the Caribbean, which needed a huge labor supply for harvest and the need for cheap slave workers. That was introduced into the Caribbean from Brazil via Barbados, the home of Caribbean rum.

The taxi ride from the cruise dock to the Botanical Gardens, a mile from Kingstown up a steep hill, was just $10. That fee included the driver waiting until after we toured and a return to the Maasdam.

Instead, to the surprise of the driver, Linda and I paid him the $10 and bid him good-by. I wanted to walk back to the ship and see what present-day Kingstown looked like. For a photographer, roaming by foot is the only way to travel. Especially when it is downhill.

This post barely touches on what there is to see and do in St. Vincent. On the other hand, the Maasdam excursions were limited, ignoring the island as a good dive destination. For more info, check out the St. Vincent and Grenadines website at http://www.discoversvg.com/

St Vincent Kingstown-1

Leaving Kingstown, St. Vincent

Carib Indian Tidbits

George Town Grand Cayman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Traditional round Carib meeting house

 

Chewing On Carib History

Because some upcoming Maasdam destinations have strong affiliations with the Carib(pronounced kar-RIB) Indians, this seems like a good time to mention their place in island history.

Fiercely independent. Unyielding. Vanished. That pretty much sums up the status of the Carib Indians throughout the Caribbean, the island group named after them.

Despite rumors to the contrary, Caribs still can be found on Dominica and St. Vincent and along the coasts of Honduras and Guyana, but elsewhere in the Caribbean they have disappeared, the victims of Europeans diseases and brutality.

One of the largest surviving groups of Caribs, who often refer to themselves as the Kalinago or Garifuna people live inside the 3,700-acre Carib Territory on Dominica. About 3,500 Caribs live inside the Reserve and another 2,000 live elsewhere on the island, the largest group of island Caribs left anywhere in the world.

George Town Grand Cayman

 

 

 

\


Carib woman selling her hand-made baskets

The Carib villages extending for 9 miles along the island’s east coast are almost indistinguishable from other parts of the island. Small wooden and concrete houses largely have replaced the traditional round great houses and A-frame buildings.

Except for two small signs marking the northern and southern ends of the Carib Territory (also sometimes referred to as the Carib Reserve. Visitors pass occasional roadside stand selling hand-woven baskets, there’s nothing to indicate you’re among the Caribs, a people who so terrified early explorers that they were relentlessly hunted almost to extinction.

They survived on Dominica only because of the mountainous landscape that made pursuit of them difficult and dangerous. The French and later the British found it made more sense to trade with the Caribs than to fight them.

George Town Grand Cayman    George Town Grand Cayman   George Town Grand Cayman
Carib Territory homes new and old-style; Carib woman with her son

The Caribs were not the original settlers of the Caribbean but part of the second wave of Amerindians from South America. The Tainos arrived first, about 500 B.C., and the Caribs appeared in their canoes about a thousand years later. Greater seamanship skills and a more war-like mentality allowed the Caribs to conquer and absorb the Tainos. They expanded as far north as Puerto Rico.

European explorers found the Caribs to be formidable opponents. They often fought to the death rather than endure slavery. On St. Vincent they were considered so dangerous that the cannons at one fort pointed inland; the Caribs were considered a far greater threat than any opponent who might arrive by sea.

The battle between guns and arrows also turned into a war of words, and the most effective propaganda story of the day was that the Caribs were “man eaters.” This resulted in the invention of a new term, “cannibal,” a corruption of what the Spanish called the Caribs, “Caribales.” Demonizing the Caribs as cannibals was a good excuse for European explorers to kill or enslave them and seize their land.

George Town Grand CaymanThe Caribs were skilled sailors despite their primitive dugout canoes

One of the wildest stories was from a French priest in the 1600s who reported that the Caribs had performed their own taste test on Europeans and concluded that the French were the tastiest, followed by the English, Dutch and very much in last place the Spanish (said to be too stringy to be worth eating).

Today’s Caribs steadfastly maintain their ancestors were not cannibals. The film was criticized the popular The National Garifuna Council criticized the popular Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest for portraying the Carib people as cannibals. Adding insult to injury was where parts of the film were shot: on Dominica.

Some historians says that what was mistaken for cannibalism actually was an important part of war rituals where the limbs of victims were taken back to their villages as trophies.

A victorious Carib apparently chewed and spit out a single mouthful of flesh of a very brave enemy so that bravery would be transferred to them. There is no evidence that the Caribs ever ate humans to satisfy hunger.

George Town Grand CaymanBecause of the canoe’s importance in Carib history, canoes
are used as altars in some Carib Territory churches.

Dominica Whale Watching

dominica whales-2

Dominica is the Caribbean’s whale watching capital

The captain of our whale and dolphin excursion boat slips a hydrophone into the water only two miles off Dominica’s shoreline and almost directly in line with downtown Roseau.

He fine-tunes the underwater listening device, hoping to pick up the clicks, pings, whistles or any other sound made by the pod of female sperm whales that reside in Dominica’s deep coastal waters year-round.

So far Moby Dick’s sisters have proven elusive, without a single sighting. However, sperm whales make distinctive clicking noises and we’ll soon know if any animals are within the sensor’s two-mile range.

“Babies sound like an old time watch, going click-click-click,” the captains tells us as we listen to the hydrophone. “Female clicks are stronger and faster, like horses galloping. The males sound like metal hitting a bottle but with the speed of a pile driver.”

We listen intently but hear only what sounds vaguely like the whine of a boat propeller. “A dolphin,” the captains says as he pulls in the cable. He returns to the flying bridge and restarts the engines, resuming our search before dropping the hydrophone again.

I glance at my watch. Almost half of our three-hour trip is over, still lots of time left to find our first whale…right? Maybe not.

dominica whales-5   dominica whales-6
       Spinner dolphin just off the bow                           Spinner dolphins showing off

Almost all the other passengers aboard our 60-foot catamaran from the Anchorage Dive Center are making a repeat trip because they didn’t see a single dolphin dorsal or whale fluke yesterday. That’s unusual because these trips usually boast a 90 percent success rate.

With 22 different kinds of cetaceans roaming through its waters, Dominica has rapidly become the Caribbean’s whale watching capital. Pilot, pygmy sperm, false killer, dwarf sperm, melon-headed whales, even giant humpbacks during winter, all pass through here.
In addition, spinner and spotted dolphin are plentiful throughout the year. As we learned just minutes after leaving the dock when a huge pod of spinner dolphin started playing around our boat. They were fun but whales are what we all yearn to see.

Even though I have yet to meet my first sperm whale, I feel I’ve known them forever. Largest of the toothed whales, they are the usual models for whale toys and drawings, and of course a giant sperm whale was Herman Melville’s choice for Moby Dick. Yet they don’t grow to a “monstrous size” as Melville implies.

The females grow only to 38 feet, the males up to 70. If an enraged male sperm whale was racing “toward us, open-mouthed, raising the waves” like Moby Dick, I’d probably regard their size differently.

dominica whales-10   dominica whales-9
                    Thar she blows!                                                       Thar she goes!

Everyone on our boat becomes charged as several people point to a short plume of spray a half-mile from us; our boat was already heading for it. My telephoto lens picks up three long black sausages with blowholes floating on the surface. The blowholes seem strangely out of alignment, positioned on the left side of the head and toward the front. An arrangement that obviously works just fine as one female expels a miniature geyser about 15 feet high.

Because of their relatively small size, I expect to see a dorsal fin, which sperm whales lack. Instead, they have a hump and a series of bumps along the ridge of their back

The whales are logging, resting on the surface. They’ve undoubtedly seen our boat countless times and at first pay little attention as we approach to within 30 yards. One of the whales becomes curious and “spy-hops,” raising her head up in the air to have a good look at us.

dominica whales-4   dominica whales-11
                 Pod of sperm whales                        Sperm whales have a hump, not a dorsal fin

Which offers a much better view of her, especially her distinctive blunt head that contains spermaceti, a white waxy substance once highly prized for making cosmetics, ointments and candles. An estimated one million sperm whales were killed before their hunting was banned. Today, somewhere between 20,000 to 100,000 remain, spread throughout almost every ocean of the world.

The whales usually stay on the surface for short stretches, about 15 minutes, then vanish for up to 45 minutes as they dive thousands of feet in search of squid, their primary food. Until then we can view and photograph them leisurely.

Our whales appear restless, a sign they’re about to dive. The captain warns us, giving us time to ready our cameras for the shot every whale watcher wants: the notched, triangular tail as it lifts slowly from the water, pauses for an instant and then slips majestically beneath the waves.

Amazingly, we quickly locate two more small groups of whales before returning to the Anchorage Hotel, sighting a total of nine whales that morning. Dominica’s whale drought definitely is over.

The Anchorage Hotel & Dive Center is Dominica’s oldest and most experienced whale watching operator. Toll free from the U.S. (1-888-790-5264) or http://www.anchoragehotel.dm/main/whalewatching.php. Their boat holds up to 30 whale watchers.

dominica whales-3
A parting shot, just the one I wanted

Maasdam’s Hands-On Cooking Class

Part 2—Chef Joseph makes his class more fun than recess

Last night the ship rocked and rolled like a 60’s band without any music, unless you count the water in the pipes sloshing back and forth. But despite the waves, I’m on my way up to deck 7 for a hands-on cooking class with Chef Joseph Caputo.

I enjoyed the free cooking demonstration with the chicken soup so much I think this $29 hands-on cooking class will be a lot of fun. There are 13 of us gathered in the Culinary Arts Center as Chef Joseph explains what we’ll be making.

Linda O"Keefe              Linda O"Keefe
Chef Joseph                                 Explaining the crepe pan

He says, “This is my Grandmother Angela’s manicotti recipe. I’ve been making it since I was 7. It is a tradition for my Italian family to have manicotti for celebrations such as Christmas, Thanksgiving and birthdays. My grandmother would get up before dawn and start making the tomato sauce, the crepes and the filling. Since the crepes aren’t very big, it was easy to eat 5 or 6.”

Linda O"Keefe        Linda O"Keefe
Blanched, peeled plum tomatoes                                              Fresh eggs

Chef Joseph quickly organizes us into 4 groups. Assignments are handed out. My group begins seeding tomatoes as others start cracking eggs and whisking in flour and milk. Another group is busy mixing the cheese filling.

Chef Joseph watches us closely and offers advice to make sure everything goes well. Before long, it’s time to start cooking the crepes. This is the part I’m nervous about. Chef recommends using an electric skillet set at 250 degrees for the crepes. He says that’s the best way to maintain an even temperature.

Linda O"Keefe              Linda O"Keefe
Bad crepe, good crepe                Pouring the crepe mix

My turn comes. I slowly pour in about 2 tablespoons of the mixture and flatten it out with the back of a spoon. In a little over a minute, the  thin crepe is ready to be turned and is done. Now I wonder about all the fun things I can make with this recipe.

Unfortunately, on the Maasdam the Culinary Arts Center stage is in the same room  (and behind the screen) of the ship’s movie theater. Things start to get a little crazy when we realize our time is almost up and we’re not done. People are coming in to watch the movie and the screen isn’t down and the the curtain hasn’t been drawn to hide the kitchen from the audience. Our group isn’t ready for their prime time.

Linda O"Keefe               Linda O"Keefe
Stirring the sauce                           Almost ready

The sauce is done but we’re still cooking crepes. When the crepes are done and laid out on the work stations, it’s time to stuff them. I put the filling at one end and from there I begin rolling, ending with the seam side down. Another team member spoons sauce into  a pan  and I place the filled crepes into the sauce. Someone else sprinkles cheese on the top. My crepes are ready for the oven at 350 for about 30 minutes.

Linda O"Keefe      Linda O"Keefe
Mixing the cheese filling                     I did these all by myself

Linda O"Keefe      Linda O"Keefe
Filling and rolling takes a while              Time to start on the salad

Now we tackle the salad dressing. The greens are combined with roasted walnuts, blue cheese, dried cranberries and a light citrus vinaigrette dressing. Chef Joseph warns, “The salad should be dressed not drowned!”

This is his own special dressing that he is sharing with us. Since he’s now bottling it for sale, I won’t give away any secrets. But it is delicious.

Linda O"Keefe                    Linda O"Keefe
 Chef Das takes a break                      Chop, chop, chop!

Maasdam’s Pinnacle Grill Chef Das stops by to join the fun. He gives pointers to several  about how to cut properly and not add extra protein to the salad.

I take pictures, roll crepes, laugh, drink wine and try to take notes. I find out I need a silicon spatula and a ceramic knife to make life in the kitchen easier. This session also helped me realize I will be back in my home kitchen in a few days. I hope my end result there will be as magnificent as this cooking session.

Linda O"Keefe              Linda O"Keefe
Chef Das and Chef Joseph       Chef Joseph serves up the goods       

  by Linda O’Keefe         

(I also look forward to the magnificent results, Tim O’Keefe)